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Sherlock Holmes Backs Potters Fields Campaign

The British government in a new idea on transforming democracy (we say this ironically) has introduced online petitions where people can petition the Prime Minister about whatever issue they'd like such as juggling ice-cream.

One of the topics this features is the controversial Potters Fields towers designed by Ian Ritchie Architects. Labelled rather misleadingly as "skyscrapers" when they are less than half the height of the precise definition of the word, the petition calls on the Prime Minister to rescind the planning permission granted to them by John Prescott after a public inquiry.

They are doing quite well so far thanks to the backing of Shad Thames Residents Association with 299 signatures including some famous celebrities and even a fictional detective. The issue has clearly bothered Sherlock Holmes enough to sign up, and Donald Pleasance who died in 1999 proving he definitely lives twice.

Given the comparisons to Daleks some have made one glaring omission seems to be Doctor Who whose name is missing from the petition. This might be because the Tardis doesn't have a permanent U.K address with which you need to complete it so the Doctor has been unfairly excluded from this.

Unfortunately for the petition founders, their campaign is lagging behind others. 2099 people have so far signed the one calling for Tony Blair to juggle ice-cream standing on his head, and 648 britons devoid of any taste in music want Spandau Ballet's Gold to replace God Save the Queen.

If you feel like giving it a boost by adding your real signature in support, or childishly vandalising it which we would never encourage, you can find the petition at -

http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/Faulty-Towers/

Article Related buildings:

Potters Fields Tower 2

Potters Fields Tower 2
Potters Fields Tower 1

Potters Fields Tower 1
Potters Fields Tower 3

Potters Fields Tower 3
Potters Fields London
Potters Fields London