Home > News > Skyscraper News > London > United Kingdom > CABE Welcome Bishopsgate Tower

CABE Welcome Bishopsgate Tower

Architecture watchdog the Commission for Architecture and Built Environment has given a big stamp of approval to the planned Bishopsgate Tower in the City of London and despite criticism of the project from other quarters such as the Civil Aviation Authority and English Heritage have actually given comments encouraging an even taller scheme on this plot "if the outcome of this was a more definite termination to the building" something that is unlikely to happen.

Interestingly, the tower that will stand near to 122 Leadenhall Street has seen its design team joined by Georg Penker, a landscaper who will work to integrate the public realm between these two landmark projects into something with some coherence.

There is a guarded welcome to the work on the base of the building, something that has special requirements to deal with the wind issues that tall buildings can throw up, "this aspect of the proposal is in danger of falling between two stools; in being a continuation of the tower as well as being a covering for a public space."

Currently work seems to be pulled between the direction of having a canopy that flows out as a continuation of the tower like a skirt, and an individual canopy structure to accommodate the public square under it.

The other comments made by CABE broadly welcome the scheme whilst respecting the fact that it is still a work in progress and undergoing design revisions to help accommodate the requirement of a shorter height with CABE saying, "We understand that work on the form and shape of the top of the building is continuing."

There is regret expressed that the type of cladding used means that the tower will not be fully transparent and the structural cross bracing that has been sparingly used in the design will not be fully visible as a result however CABE accept this thanks to the environmental requirements placed on the design.

As with similar tall projects, they also call for public access to the building that in the very least is done in the form of Open House. Many other tall planned buildings in London will have substantial public areas in them and this puts pressure on the developer to do likewise with their own scheme.

Originally plans had anticipated a tower of 307.25 metres in height but this looks like being reduced to 288 metres to ensure the safety of air traffic in the area. It had previously been set to be the tallest building in the U.K and western Europe but the height reduction has once again placed London Bridge Tower ahead. It will however still be over 100 metres taller than the current tallest in the City, even with the planned height reduction.

Article Related buildings:

The Bishopsgate Tower

The Bishopsgate Tower
The Leadenhall Building

The Leadenhall Building
6-8 Bishopsgate

6-8 Bishopsgate
Bishopsgate Tower London
Bishopsgate Tower London